September 2006 Archives

Blip

20 September 2006 | Permalink

I have a new job. In a few hours, I start work at blip.tv. Making up my mind to leave my previous job wasn't an easy decision but I'm looking forward to trying my hand at something new. And I think it should be good: Blip seems to be that one in a thousand thing, a Web 2.0 startup with real solid potential, and the founders are some of the brightest people I know. It's quite an honor to have been asked to join them as Employee #001. I just hope I can keep up.

I have no plans to turn disoriented.net into a videoblog, though. I'm still trying to master words and still pictures; I'm definitely not ready to branch out into moving pictures yet.

 

Patiwat?

19 September 2006 | Permalink
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For the eleventh time since 1932, the military has seized power in Thailand. It's hard to say what the outcome will be. The most recent coup, in 1991, led to the installation of prime minister Anand Panyarachun who, despite being a military appointee, was quite a long way from being the worst ever Thai prime minister. Panyarachun is still a respected figure. Lately, he's been active in the National Reconciliation Commission which sought to address the violence in the south of Thailand, and he's an outspoken opponent of the current prime minister Thaksin Shinawatra. He could be an obvious choice for the head of an 'interim' administration.

There's some grounds for hoping that the present coup won't turn violent but even if it doesn't - and even allowing for the fact that widespread discontent with Thaksin had to find some outlet - this can't be good. It's disconcerting to be reminded that even in a modern democracy like Thailand, the military can still be waiting in the wings.

 

Book

06 September 2006 | Permalink

I spent yesterday evening working on the website for my friend Melissa's scholarly two-volume encyclopedia of prostitution and sex work, which has just been published by Greenwood Press. The press (and Melissa) have done a beautiful job on it and it looks lovely. It's also a fascinating read, although at US$225 it's more likely to grace the shelves of a public library than someone's private bookshelf.

This is the culmination of more than two years work for Melissa, and she's justifiably pleased with the result.